Bizarre Medical Facts

Breathing may change your mind about free will
Breathing may change your mind about free will

Scientists at EPFL in Switzerland have shown that you are more likely to initiate a voluntary decision as you exhale. Published in today's issue of Nature Communications, these findings propose a new angle on an almost 60-year-old neuroscientific debate about free will and the involvement of the human brain.

Swiper's Thumb and Other Tech-Related Injuries
"Swiper's Thumb" and Other Tech-Related Injuries

Nearly half of all U.S. adults say they can’t live without their smartphones, according to the Pew Research Center. But what happens when our fondness for the latest electronic gadgets creates more pain than gain?

The brain of migraine sufferers is hyper-excitable
The brain of migraine sufferers is hyper-excitable

Individuals who suffer from migraine headaches appear to have a hyper-excitable visual cortex.

A happy partner leads to a healthier future
A happy partner leads to a healthier future

Science now supports the saying, “happy wife, happy life.”

The way you dance is unique, and computers can tell it's you
The way you dance is unique, and computers can tell it's you

Almost everyone responds to music with movement, and a recent study has shown that our own individual dance style is almost always the same – regardless of type of music – and a computer can identify the dancer with astounding accuracy.

Weight loss improves sleep apnoea by reducing tongue fat
Weight loss improves sleep apnoea by reducing tongue fat

Obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) have improved symptoms from weight loss due to a reduction in tongue fat.

Common Indian fruit shows promise as a cancer fighter
Common Indian fruit shows promise as a cancer fighter

Recent research has revealed that the Asian fruit commonly eaten in India known as bitter melon shows promise in slowing the progression of cancer by preventing it from growing and spreading.

Wet and cold weather linked to increased cancer rates
Wet and cold weather linked to increased cancer rates

For the first time, a study has discovered a link between living in cold, wet regions and increased risk of cancer.

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