Tramadol tied to higher mortality rates than NSAIDs in osteoarthritis patients

 

Tramadol tied to higher mortality rates than NSAIDs in osteoarthritis patients

 

A new study has shown that patients with osteoarthritis (OA) who were treated with tramadol had a significantly higher mortality risk during the first year of treatment when compared with patients treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

They also found that tramadol users had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, venous thromboembolism, and hip fractures than NSAID users.

Although the mortality risk of the use of tramadol has been highlighted previously, the risk comparison between tramadol and NSAIDs has previously been inconclusive.

In the present study, the team compared data from patients who received a first prescription of tramadol, naproxen, diclofenac, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, or codeine.

At the patients’ one year follow-up, it was found that tramadol users had a higher mortality risk than users of naproxen, diclofenac, and COX-2 inhibitors, but not higher than codeine users.

Tramadol users were also found to be at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease  and venous thromboembolism than users of diclofenac and COX-2 inhibitors, and a higher risk of hip fractures than users of naproxen, diclofenac, and COX-2 inhibitors.

Regarding the study, Thomas Schwenk, MD, from the University of Nevada, Reno, said: "Tramadol might be an option for patients in whom NSAIDs are contraindicated, but it should be prescribed as judiciously as traditional opioids."

 

References

Li L et al. Association of tramadol with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, venous thromboembolism and hip fractures among patients with osteoarthritis. A population-based study. Abstract OP0191. Presented at the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) 2020 Congress on June 4, 2020.

MDedge. Tramadol mortality risk in osteoarthritis could outweigh benefits. 5 June 2020.

News

Antibiotic resistance is an increasing battle for scientists to overcome, as more antimicrobials are urgently needed to treat biofilm-associated infections. However scientists from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick say research into natural antimicrobials could provide candidates to fill the antibiotic discovery gap.

Sitting for prolonged periods can increase the risk of diabetes and other health problems. While physical activity recommendations suggest breaking up sitting time, it is not known if all individuals respond the same way.

Essences are liquid solutions that contain the energetic imprint of flowers, plants or other elements of nature. The best known are the Bach essences, but hundreds of others are available from producers around the world. They are usually taken orally, though can also be used topically to improve mental, emotional and spiritual well-being.

A team of researchers, including the University of Adelaide, has found most dietary recommendations provided by national governments are incompatible with global health and environmental targets such as the Paris Climate Agreement, and are in need of reform.

The COMPLEMENTARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION (The CMA) © 2012. No part of this site may be reproduced without the express permission of The Complementary Medical Association. If used without prior consent a charge of US $1,000 per article, or mini section is paid (US $50 per word (minimum) will be charged. This is not meant to reflect a commercial rate for the content, but as a punitive cost and to reimburse The CMA for legal fees and time costs). Use of the contents, without permission will be taken as consent to bill the illegal user in full.