Lifestyle activities are related to restored cognition

 

Lifestyle activities are related to restored cognition

 

A new study has found that older adults with mild cognitive impairment are not only likely to avoid progression, but also experience restoration of their baseline cognition when they begin and continue lifestyle activities, including reading, sports, socialising, and other hobbies. This is significant due to the lack of effective prevention and treatment options for dementia.

 

Full article here.

Study reveals dietary factors associated with mental health

Study reveals dietary factors associated with mental health

Previous research has shown that a healthy diet with few
processed foods results in a lower risk of health conditions ...

Homoeopathic Hawthorn for Hypertension in Dogs With Early-stage Heart Failure

Aromatherapy in patients with malignant brain tumours

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Of course, we innately know that being in nature relaxes and refreshes us and we find nature deeply healing – however is there more to it? Could there in fact be a more profound rejuvenating effect of simply ‘being’ in nature? Something which revitalises us and could contribute profoundly, simply and realistically to halting, reversing, and even curing chronic diseases and conditions which we associate with being ‘just a natural part of the ageing process’?

The development of chemicals in the last hundred or so years that would serve to help us be cleaner, live more efficiently and generally ‘improve’ our lives has had a devastating effect upon our immune systems.

Naturally, we are all familiar with the idea of spring cleaning – and usually, this applies to our environment and, for many of us, our thoughts also turn to optimal health strategies.

Medical researchers have begun looking towards the ocean with hopes of finding novel marine chemicals that could potentially be used to treat human illness.

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